It was a blink and you’ll miss it moment, but an important day for the future of public transportation on the North Shore. Staff from TransLink was on hand from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the City Library on Lonsdale on October 15th to reveal plans for the 10-Year Vision for Metro Vancouver Transit and Transportation. Maps were displayed, media kits handed out, questions answered, surveys taken and visitors directed to a TransLInk website (URL below) that contains details about how the Vision will affect the North Shore.

Phase One of the 10-Year Vision will reduce road congestion and add new transit services in every Lower Mainland community, starting in early 2017. On the North Shore, changes will be modest. A total of 8 bus lines will see increased service. The popular 240 bus to downtown Vancouver, for instance, will see more buses during peak times, reducing wait times to 7 minutes during peak periods. Saturday afternoons on the 240 will be reduced to 8 minutes. Route 229 will see more frequent service. A new B-Line bus from Park Royal along Marine Drive and Main Street to Lower Lynn (actual route to be decided) will be implemented. Upgrades will be made to Phibbs Exchange and the Lonsdale Quay terminus, although details are not supplied. The Seabus will upgrade to 15 minutes at all times and – with the introduction of a third SeabUs – every 10 minutes during peak times. The Vision Plan does not address traffic congestion on the Second Narrows Bridge or the Upper Levels Highway.

The Phase One Plan will form the basis of public consultations this fall (October 11-31, 2016) while the Phase Two Plan will be brought forward in 2017, and the final Phase Three Plan will be brought forward in 2019. Phase One of the 10-Year Vision proposes new investment of approximately $2 billion in expanded transit services, transit infrastructure, and improvements for roads, cycling, and walking. The entire region will see a 10 percent increase in bus service hours, as well as more frequent service on SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express.

Funding will be required from all three levels of government, as well as users of the transit system and road network, and property owners. Initial funding will come from TransLink’s existing sources, as well as investments from the federal and provincial governments. New forms of revenue will also be necessary, including the sale of TransLink’s surplus property, and a fee on new developments. Metro Vancouver residents will see tax and fare increases, averaging 5 to 10 cents per year in the first three years. A change to the TransLink property tax would add an additional $3 each year on the average home, starting in 2017. A new region-wide fee on land development activity may be introduced by 2020.

On average, 7% of a homeowner’s property tax bill goes to TransLink. The remainder of property taxes goes to the Province and local municipality. Under the current system, the average homeowner sees an annual increase in property taxes due to TransLink of about 0.10%, or about $3 on the average. The Phase One Plan is proposing to adjust the TransLink property tax formula to better account for new development, in order to keep up with inflation and growing per capita usage of transit and transportation look at here. With the proposed change, the average existing homeowner in the region would see an additional $3 increase in property taxes each year. On average, 7% of a homeowner’s property tax bill goes to TransLink. The remainder of property taxes goes to the Province and local municipality.

 

Under the current system, the average homeowner sees an annual increase in property taxes due to TransLink of about 0.10%, or about $3 on the average. The Phase One Plan is proposing to adjust the TransLink property tax formula to better account for new development, in order to keep up with inflation and growing per capita usage of transit and transportation. With the proposed change, the average existing homeowner in the region would see an additional $3 increase in property taxes each year. The Government of Canada has offered $370 million in capital funding for the Phase One Plan – and will make billions more dollars available if the Province and the region can provide ‘matching’ funds. The Government of British Columbia has committed $246 million in capital funding for the Phase One Plan.

Survey and Feedback: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/tenyearvision/?kiosk_timeout=5

TransLink:  http://tenyearvision.translink.ca/

By staff reporter

There are no comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked (*).